If you are a Trinity River angler, merchant, or concerned citizen, it’s time to address the absolute decimation of fish at the Tish Tang, Hoopa Weir. Yes, it’s politically sensitive, but the taking of (by Hoopa Fisheries’ admission 90 percent) of hatchery steelhead, coho and most of the chinook salmon is their objective.

To top it off many of the non-native locals yard fish out of the area daily. This is not sustainable, and a disgrace to fisheries management. To see it reminds me of the past videos of Japanese commercial fishermen clubbing dolphins caught in seine nets, but in this case salmon herded behind the weir.

This year very few fish made it past the lineup of treble hooks, gill nets, locals and weir (look at upstream Fish and Wildlife Weir data). The quota means nothing, since non-native monitoring of take is not allowed.

Yes, the Trinity partially flows through the Hoopa reservation, but it belongs to us all, and we share the fish. With the weir in place, Tish Tang could be considered the new headwaters of the river, since not much gets further upstream. We need constructive solutions to this critical issue.

(2) comments

rapidrdr

Noticed that the vote was 7-1 with Hoopa being the no vote. I don’t understand the negative vote. It seems that more naturally timed flows would help this fading fishery, and that Hoopa fisheries would really be on board. More water, particularly in the Fall would be a God-send.

rapidrdr

Whoops, response is in relation to article outlining potential changes in regulation and timing of water releases on Trinity🤘

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